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ELECTIONS 2014

 

 

 

 

GENERAL

CANDIDATES

 

 

 

 

Prabowo

Jokowi

Sri Mulyani

Bakrie

 

 

ELECTION ANALYSES

 

 

 


 

Survey Soegeng Sarjadi Syndicate
ranks Prabowo highest

October 26 2011

Jakarta (ANTARA News) - Prabowo Subianto, chairman of the Advisory Board of the Great Indonesia Movement Party (Gerindra), is ranked the highest as a presidential candidate, according to survey results released here on Wednesday.

The results of the survey by the Soegeng Sarjadi Syndicate from October 3-8, 2011 in 33 provinces in the country involving 1,318 respondents showed 28 percent of respondents chose Prabowo as presidential candidate while 10.6 percent chose Constitutional Court chairman Mahfud MD.

 

 

 

 


 

 Prabowo Subianto versus Aburizal Bakrie

The 2104 presidential election will likely see a duel between
General-turned-businessman Prabowo Subianto
and Business Tycoon Aburizal Bakrie,
according to political observers.
10/31/2011

 

 

 

 

Prabowo Subianto
Gerindra

  

Prabowo ranked highest as presidential candidate
Jakarta (ANTARA News)
Prabowo Subianto, chairman of the Advisory Board of Gerindra
is ranked highest as a presidential candidate,
according to survey results released here on Wednesday.

Wed, October 26 2011

 

 

 

Aburizal Bakrie
Golkar

 Bakrie for President?

Bakrie has proven himself an adroit and ambitious politician
who occupies a fairly unique place among Indonesia's upper-tier business community because he is a pribumi,
or native Indonesian, while the bulk of the country's business establishment is dominated by ethnic Chinese

Tuesday, 30 November 2010

 

 

Megawati
PDI-P

Surveys Name Three Presidential Candidates
Indonesia Vote Network (JSI), which surveyed on
October 10 to 15, 2011. Being included in this survey,
Megawati
was selected as a presidential candidate
with the highest support

27 Oktober 2011
Democratic party of Struggle

Taufik Tells PDI-P (and his Wife)
To Give Younger Candidates a Chance

 

 

 

Sri Mulyani
Serikat Rakyat Independen

 US and Australian Diplomats
contacted PPAD seeking support
for candidacy of Sri Mulyani for President 2014

Is this a cover-up to hide their real candidate?
The US is known to favour a military figure.

July 2011

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Indonesian presidential election, 2014

The next Indonesian presidential election will be held in 2014. It will be Indonesia's third direct presidential election, and will elect a president for a five year term. Incumbent President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono is constitutionally barred from seeking third term in the election.

 

Possible Candidates


*

Sri Mulyani Indrawati, Managing Director of World Bank Group, former Minister of Finance[5]

*

Anas Urbaningrum, chairman of Democratic Party[6]

*

Prabowo Subianto, former Army Strategic and Reserve (KOSTRAD) commander and 2009 vice presidential candidate [7]

*

Aburizal Bakrie, chairman of Golkar Party [8]

*

Hatta Rajasa, Coordinating Minister for Economy [9]

*

Mahfud MD, Chairman of Indonesian Constitutional Court [10]

*

Wiranto, former Indonesian Armed Forces commander and 2004 presidential candidate, 2009 vice presidential candidate[11]

*

Megawati Soekarnoputri, former president [12]

*

Jusuf Kalla, former Vice President [13]

*

Sutiyoso, former Governor of Jakarta [14]

*

Pramono Edhie Wibowo, Army Chief of Staff [15]

 

Background Note: Indonesia

 

 

 

Prabowo ranked highest as presidential candidate
Wed, October 26 2011

Prabowo Subianto




Jakarta (ANTARA News) - Prabowo Subianto, chairman of the Advisory Board of the Great Indonesia Movement Party (Gerindra), is ranked the highest as a presidential candidate, according to survey results released here on Wednesday.

The results of the survey by the Soegeng Sarjadi Syndicate from October 3-8, 2011 in 33 provinces in the country involving 1,318 respondents showed 28 percent of respondents chose Prabowo as presidential candidate while 10.6 percent chose Constitutional Court chairman Mahfud MD.

Other candidates included former economic minister Sri Mulyani (7.4 percent), Golkar Party chairman Aburizal Bakrie (6.8 percent), Nahdlatul Ulama Islamic organization chief Said Akil Siradj (6.0 percent), Muhammadiyah Islamic leader Din Syamsuddin (5.2 percent), army chief of staff General Pramono Edhie Wibowo (4.2 percent), former vice president Jusuf Kalla (4.0 percent), chief security minister Djoko Suyanto (3.2 percent), chief economic minister Hatta Rajasa (2.8 percent) and businessman Surya Paloh (2.5 percent).

Soegeng Saryadi Syndicate executive director Toto Sugiarto said most respondents had chosen a military figure to be the country`s next president because they missed a strict leader and therefore 65 percent had chosen Prabwowo.
"33.8 percent of respondents still believe a military figure is fit to be elected president in 2014," he said.

Second in the ranking was an academic collecting 17.2 votes, followed by religious figure (12.1 percent), businessman (9.7 percent) and political party figure (8.9 percent).
The results of the survey done based on a stratified random sampling indicated that the military-civilian dichotomy has not yet completely vanished.
The choice of a military figure correlates with public desire for the government to focus on corruption eradication.

A total of 40.5 percent of respondents urged the government to immediately settle the corruption and bribery problems.
Other problems needing urgent settlements were poverty according to 29.8 percent of respondents, unemployment (16 percent), mafia operations in all sectors (10.4 percent) and sovereignty (3.1 percent).

About a vice president, most respondents choose an honest and smart person. The two qualities were represented in Constitutional Court figure Mahfud MD who won 15.6 percent of votes.

Following him were Sri Mulyani Indrawati (8.0 percent), Pramono Edhie Wibowo (7.1 percent), Din Syamsuddin (6.8 percent), KH Said Aqil Siradj (6.3 percent), Djoko Suyanto (3.9 percent) and Puan Maharani, the daughter of former president Megawati Soekarnoputri (3.0 percent).

Earlier, the Reform Institute issued survey results showing Aburizal Bakrie to be the most popular figure as a candidate for the 2014 presidential elections. He obtained 13.58 percent votes of 2,010 respondents involved in the survey.

In the survey Prabowo Subianto was ranked second with 8.46 percent of the votes.

Editor: Priyambodo RH
COPYRIGHT © 2011

 

 

Surveys Name Three Presidential Candidates
"Megawati, Prabowo, and Aburizal are the three strongest candidates"

27 Oktober 2011

 

Aburizal Bakrie

Megawati

Prabowo

 

 

 

"Megawati, Prabowo, Aburizal
are the three strongest candidates,"
said Widdi Aswindi,
JSI Executive Director.

27 Oktober 2011

 

 

VIVAnews - Three research institutes have released surveys on the electability of party and presidential candidates.

All three revealed a number of figures who are considered the most popular to participate in the 2014 general elections.

Reform Institute, which conducted the survey between September 12 to 24, 2011, found that if Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono and Megawati Sukarnoputri are excluded, General Chairman of Golkar Party Aburizal Bakrie tops the list with 13.58 percent of votes. Prabowo Subianto follows with 8.46 percent, Jusuf Kalla 7.06 percent, Hidayat Nurwahid 5.17 percent, and Ani Yudhoyono 4.13 percent.

Soegeng Sarjadi Syndicate (SSS) which held the surveys on October 3-8, 2011, stated, if Yudhoyono and Megawati are not involved, Prabowo would garner most of the votes, by 28 percent of the respondents. Coming next are Mahfud MD with 10.6 percent, Sri Mulyani Indrawati 7.4 percent, Aburizal Bakrie 6.8 percent, KH Said Aqil Siradj 6 percent, Din Syamsuddin 5.2 percent, Pramono Edhie Wibowo 4.2 percent, Jusuf Kalla 4.0 percent and a dozen other names pocketing below 4 percent.

SSS also conducted a special survey on vice presidential candidates. Mahfud MD is the figure for whom respondents would vote, amounting to 15.6 percent. After him are Sri Mulyani with 8 percent, Pramono Edhie Wibowo 7.1 percent, Din Syamsuddin 6.8 percent, Said Aqil Siradj and Djoko Suyanto each 3.9 percent, and Puan Maharani 3 percent.


A different name list was resulted by Indonesia Vote Network (JSI), which surveyed on October 10 to 15, 2011. Being included in this survey, Megawati was selected as a presidential candidate with the highest support, which is 19.6 percent. Other presidential candidates whom the general public prefer after Megawati are, successively, Prabowo Subianto (10.8 percent), Aburizal Bakrie (8.9 percent), Wiranto (7.3 percent), Sri Sultan Hamengkubuwono X (6.5 percent) , Hidayat Nur Wahid (3.8 percent), Surya Paloh (2.3 percent), Sri Mulyani (2 percent), Ani Yudhoyono (1.6 percent), Hatta Rajasa (1.6 percent), Anas Urbaningrum (1, 5 percent), Sutanto (0.2 percent), and Djoko Suyanto (0.2 percent).

"Megawati, Prabowo, and Aburizal are the three strongest candidates," said Widdi Aswindi, JSI Executive Director.
• VIVAnews

 

 

 

 


Bakrie for President?

Written by Our Correspondent
Tuesday, 30 November 2010

Indonesia's notorious businessman appears to be the front-runner

The mid-November announcement that banking scion Nathaniel Rothschild had acquired 25 percent of Bumi Resources, controlled by Aburizal Bakrie, has largely been met with astonishment by those familiar with the operations of Indonesia's most famous and notorious businessman.

That is because what Bakrie has done to minority shareholders over the last couple of decades is the stuff of legend. The Bakrie family empire has nearly capsized twice since the 1997-1998 Asian Financial Crisis, the first time bobbing back to the surface only because a thoroughly corrupt Indonesian government bailed Bakrie out. The second time, amid allegations of massive share manipulation, Bakrie shares fell by 30 percent and resulted in the closure for three days of the Indonesian Stock Exchange at the onset of the global credit crisis. That later resulted in a months-long campaign by furious bankers and shareholders to get their money back after the then-Finance Minister Sri Mulyani Indrawati blocked another round of bailouts.

Rothschild — a member of one of the world's most respected banking families, and one of te world's most cautious — now has put US$3 billion into Indonesia, metamorphosing Vallar Plc, a mining investment vehicle, into what amounts to an Indonesian coal venture. In addition to the US$1.43 billion to Bakrie, he put another US$1.57 billion in cash and new shares into Berau Coal and Energy, controlled by Indonesia's Roeslani family. Vallar's shareholders retain only a minority stake in the company.

Southeast Asia has not been kind to minority shareholders. They have regularly taken a fearful beating in Malaysia, Indonesia, Thailand and the Philippines among others. But Bakrie is arguably at the very top of the Asia minority-thumping pantheon. Even the docile Indonesian Stock Exchange, however reluctantly, gave three Bakrie companies a Rp500 million (US$55,550) slap on the wrist for misstating cash reserves. After the shares fell off the cliff in the wake of the global financial crisis, they suddenly caught fire again in May of 2009, with the shares of seven family company stocks tripling in value on average, causing the exchange to suspend trading in some companies because of suspicions they were being manipulated.

So the question has to be asked: did Rothschild know what he was getting into? Several news sources have pointed out that from beginning to end, the transactions only took a few weeks to conclude.

But some market-watchers might not be taking into account Aburizal Bakrie's growing clout. He is hoping to become the country's next president when elections are held in 2014 and improbably appears to be the front-runner – a far cry from July 2009, when the Golkar Party, which he now heads, was drubbed in national elections by what appeared to be a reform movement headed by reelected President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono. Sri Mulyani Indrawati, reappointed finance minister, was clearly out to usher in a new political era in Indonesia.

There was a widespread perception that Bakrie's fortunes would reflect Indonesia's future path. If that is true, it is depressing. Today Sri Mulyani has been banished, quitting the government to join the World Bank as a managing director after charging in an interview with the Wall Street Journal that Bakrie had been behind the manufacture of a scandal over the US$710 million bailout of Bank Century in 2008, which at the time seemed poised to drag the country's banking sector into the muck of the global crisis. The point? To ensnare her and Boediono, the respected former Bank Indonesia head who became Yudhoyono's vice president.

Yudhoyono seems strangely lethargic in the face of Bakrie's resurgence. Golkar was nominally in the opposition after the 2009 national presidential election. The president should have been able to stop the action against the two officials back in October 2009 when he named his cabinet and, at the last minute, Bakrie brought Golkar in from the cold to rejoin the government. Yudhoyono could have extracted a promise that the Golkar leader would keep out of the fray. The president was at the height of his political power and personal popularity as a result of his strong electoral victory.

Instead, Sri Mulyani's resignation in May following months of bitter, highly political and inconclusive hearings in the House of Representatives, appears to have set the stage for five years of paralysis in which reform stops and Bakrie and his fellow businessmen go about business as usual.

Bakrie himself appears to be deeply enmeshed in a scandal involving former tax official Gayus Tambunan, who is charged with amassing vast wealth through taking bribes from corporations to cheat on their taxes. Tambunan has testified in court that companies that paid him off included subsidiaries of the Bakrie conglomerate. One report had Tambunan, whose latest shenanigans involve bribing his way out of detention on a regular basis, meeting Bakrie himself in Bali during a recent tennis tournament. Bakrie's lawyers and numerous Golkar politicians have denied that tale and preliminary criminal libel charges have been brought by Bakrie against five media outlets for running the story.

Bakrie has proven himself an adroit and ambitious politician who occupies a fairly unique place among Indonesia's upper-tier business community because he is a pribumi, or native Indonesian, while the bulk of the country's business establishment is dominated by ethnic Chinese. In May, he was appointed “managing chairman” of a new government joint political secretariat at a closed meeting of coalition parties at Yudhoyono's home, just two days after Sri Mulyani said she was leaving.

It is clear from his close confidants that he has his eye on the presidency, and as Indonesia's most powerful pribumi, he might appeal to the electorate despite his reputation as a corporate pirate. He is a Javanese, the dominant ethnic group, which gives him clout that Jusuf Kalla, a wealthy ethnic Bugis businessman and Golkar politician who served as Yudhoyono's vice president in his first term, was never able to muster. Kalla and Bakrie are fierce rivals.

Yudhoyono's Democratic Party has no one who looks capable of being a successor. Megawati Sukarnoputri, the leader of the Indonesian Democratic Party of Struggle, known by its Indonesian language initials PDI-P, appears to be a spent force. Wiranto and Prabowo Subianto, both retired generals, have been sanctioned by international rights organizations for their roles in attempting to suppress the East Timor independence movement, among other nastiness at the end of the Suharto era. Vice President Boediono seems to have no political ambitions, and aside from the tantalizing possible return of Sri Mulyani, whose support is largely limited to intellectuals and commentators, there appear to be few people at this point to challenge Bakrie.

So maybe Rothschild recognized something longtime Indonesia watchers didn't. Even as a minority shareholder, it doesn't hurt to be reflected in the glow of the leading presidential candidate, and one who, despite his reputation, could lead the country – albeit hardly in the direction of reform.

 

 

 

Taufik Kiemas

Megawati

 

 


Taufik Tells PDI-P (and his Wife) To Give Younger Candidates a Chance

Ezra Sihite & Markus Junianto Sihaloho | October 25, 2011

How old is too old to run for president? For Taufik Kiemas, the answer is 68 — the age his wife, former President Megawati Sukarnoputri, will be in 2014.

Taufik, the chairman of the advisory board of the Indonesian Democratic Party of Struggle (PDI-P), said his wife, the party’s chairwoman, should reconsider her own plans to run in 2014.
“It would be better if Madame thinks first before moving ahead [in the 2014 elections.] She would be 68 years old in 2014,” he said.

He said the PDI-P should be looking for a replacement for Megawati. “If we prepare younger members in the next three years, one of them will certainly emerge. The older members must give way,” he said.
Taufik’s feelings aside, a recent poll by the Indonesian Voting Network (JSI) found that Megawati and Prabowo Subianto, the founder of the Great Indonesia Movement Party (Gerindra), were the most popular potential presidential candidates for 2014.

Taufik declined to name any potential young PDI-P candidates, nor did he say whether his daughter, Puan Maharani, 38, would be among those groomed.
For her part, Puan said she was ready to run for president. “As a cadre, I’m ready to be assigned to any position, especially if it is mandated by the party,” she said. “My grandfather was president, my mother was also president, and hopefully in 2014 we can win.”

The same family political dynamics were seen during the PDI-P’s last congress, when Taufik pushed for the creation of a deputy chair post in the party, ostensibly for Puan, which was rejected by Megawati’s backers.
The couple have failed to see eye to eye for years, and Taufik said it was his opinion that Megawati should not run, not the party’s.

“Bung Karno once said that leaders would always be born if they were well prepared. Every era would give birth to a leader and they had to be prepared,” he said, referring to the country’s founding president, Sukarno, Megawati’s father.
He said the country and its political parties needed to do a better job of grooming as many potential young leaders as possible.

Taufik added that if the PDI-P insisted on fielding the same old candidates in the 2014 legislative and presidential elections, it risked becoming a laughingstock.
“We once laughed at Suharto when he still wanted to be president at 70. How come we are following in his steps?” he said.

Maruarar Sirait, a young PDI-P politician, rejected the idea that Megawati was too old and said the party should throw its weight behind her in 2014.
He said the results of the JSI survey, which was not commissioned by the party, showed that Megawati still had the support to be a successful candidate in 2014.
“If all the requirements are met, then there is no reason to forbid Mrs. Mega to run for the presidency,” Maruarar said.

Taufik’s comments also sparked a debate among politicians over age requirements for presidential candidates. Priyo Budi Santoso, a deputy House speaker from the Golkar Party, said that age should not become an issue for anyone wishing to serve the state.
“Megawati is also a central figure in this country. If a figure of her calibre still wants to go forward [with a presidential candidacy] then it should be respected. And the same goes for Aburizal Bakrie. If he is pushed [to run], do not forbid him,” Priyo said, referring to the Golkar chairman, who will be 66 when the presidential election takes place.

Priyo said there was no need to rush younger leaders.
“If Golkar wants to back senior figures it should be allowed to, don’t scold them,” he said.

 

 

 

Jusuf Kalla:

Born May 15, 1942

Aburizal Bakrie:

Born Nov. 15, 1946

Megawati Sukarnoputri:

Born Jan. 23, 1947

Wiranto:

Born April 4, 1947

Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono

Born Sept. 9, 1949

Prabowo Subianto:

Born Oct. 17, 1951

Ani Yudhoyono:

Born July 6, 1952

Sri Mulyani Indrawati:

Born Aug. 26, 1962

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


15 New Parties Register For 2014
Fifteen new political parties registered for the 2014 general elections ahead of the deadline on Monday night, an official said.
Ronna Nirmala | 12:37 AM August 23, 2011

Fifteen new political parties registered for the 2014 general elections ahead of the deadline on Monday night, an official said.
Sucipto, a spokesman for the Justice and Human Rights Ministry, said the registration closed on Monday at 11:59 p.m.
The Pancasila Democracy Party was the last to register at about 9 p.m. One party that had already registered with the ministry, the Indonesian Nation Sovereignty Party, withdrew its name on Monday without explanation.

Also on Monday, representatives of the Independent People’s Union Party (SRI) submitted some paperwork to complete the registration process it started on Aug. 3. SRI has earned a lot of media coverage for a party its size because of its stated intention to nominate Sri Mulyani Indrawati, the former finance minister and World Bank managing director, as its presidential candidate for 2014.
Achmad Gelora, a ministry official, said the National Republic Party (Nasrep), founded by Hutomo “Tommy” Mandala Putra Suharto, the youngest son of the late President Suharto, also registered for the elections.

Other parties of note to register were the National Democratic Party, linked to Golkar executive Surya Paloh, and the United National Party (PPN), founded by the heads of 12 political parties that failed to win seats in the House of Representatives in the 2009 elections.
The Insulinde National Prosperity Party (Partai Kemakmuran Bangsa Nusantara or PKBN), founded by Yenny Wahid, the daughter of the late former President Abdurrahman “Gus Dur” Wahid, appears to be the new name for the faction of the National Awakening Party (PKB) that she has headed for some time.
Yenny said the PKBN had not officially decided on a presidential candidate. She added, however, that “if most of my supporters agree, then Mahfud will be the PKBN’s sole candidate for the presidency.” She was referring to Constitutional Court chairman Muhammad Mahfud.

Other new parties include the Satria Piningit Party (Chosen Knight Party), the Republican Works Party (PAKAR), the Republican Struggle Party, the Independent Party, the One Republic Party, the Indonesian People’s Force Party, the Thoriqot Islam Party and the
Awakening Great Indonesia Party. The 74 existing registered parties did not need to reregister, but will be subject to verification, Sucipto said.
Achmad said verification would start this week and continue until Sept. 22. The names of the parties that passed the verification would be announced about three weeks after that, he said.

Meanwhile, Apung Widadi, a researcher at Indonesia Corruption Watch, said none of the nine parties at the House had submitted their financial statement for an audit by the BPK, the state audit agency.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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